Hemp, Hemp, Hooray!

Happy Monday Blogees!

I heard 1.5 million Americans used the Super Bowl as a reason to take off work. Luckily, hemp is something that never takes a day off, and hopefully your state will be the next to legalize growing it commercially. So far, only 16 states are approved to do so. Hemp cannot get you high (like, at all), it’s easy to cultivate, is a great alternative material for production, and creates jobs!

Too bad it’s still cannabis, because close-minded law makers feel if farmers are allowed to grow it, growing cannabis with high THC will be allowed too. OR farmers will use the clearance to illegally grow stronger cannabis for consumption or sale.

Isn’t it funny how substances that are actually harmful aren’t given as much precaution as cannabis until AFTER people have been negatively affected? I’m just saying.

 

Hemp_Infographic_web
Picture: HempInformer.com

In 2014 the federal government permitted states to cultivate industrial hemp for research. Not every state was super eager to hop on to that legislation, of course.

Here in Illinois, industrial hemp can be grown for research purposes only. Farmers can apply for permits to grow hemp for universities, but it still doesn’t guarantee the security and profit of growing hemp  for production purposes.  In Indiana, Perdue University was the only site where hemp was allowed to grow, until a few days ago when the state was legalized to grow hemp commercially. This is a big, necessary move.

State to state legislation of growing industrial hemp creates opportunities for some, and losses for others. Farmers have already seen positive progress in states that allow the crop. In Kentucky, farmers produced 3,200 acres in 74 counties in 2017. And with all that production comes jobs…SO many that the state was approved to grow 12,000 acres this year. Farm on Kentucky, farm on.

 

Check this video on just a few of the many uses of hemp!

 

 

“From our perspective, it provides an additional crop opportunity for our farmers and a market for a new crop that they would have an opportunity to grow.”   –Bill Bodine, IL Farm Bureau

 

Links:

High Times

Chicago Tonight-WTTW

Canna Recruiter

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